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What You Need to Know

According to FIFA, the international governing body for the game of soccer, there are seventeen laws (or rules) governing the playing of the game. It is the responsibility of the coaches to know and understand these rules and to pass this knowledge on to the players. The following abbreviated summary of the laws and the deviations therefrom authorised by the Board of Directors of the Evansville Youth Soccer League are provided as a guide to the most important points. The summary is not intended to be all-inclusive or to cover all of the minor points which might be encountered in the course of playing the game, even at the recreational level. The full language of the laws and text of specific rulings by FIFA interpreting the laws can be purchased in booklet form in bookstores or from the Indiana Youth Soccer Association.

The basic laws of the game change very little from year to year. However, the application of the laws to specific situations is changed frequently by rulings issued by FIFA and, in our case, by modifications authorized by the Board of Directors of the Evansville Youth Soccer League. The summary included herein is designed to cover the basic unchanging part of each law first. Then the interpretations and local modifications applicable to Evansville Youth Soccer League programs are provided under a separate heading.

It is the policy of the Evansville Youth Soccer League to retain as much as possible the intent of the fundamental laws of the game, deviating only when it is necessary to do so to account for the age of the players and the recreational character of the League's programs. In interpreting the modifications of the laws adopted by the Evansville Youth Soccer League (where the specific language of the modification may not apply exactly to a given situation) the guiding principle should be that the desired interpretation is the one which is consistent with the laws as stated by FIFA, taking into account any requirements necessary to guarantee the safety of players and to advance the principles of sportsmanship, honesty and fair play in a recreational environment.

These playing rules as modified are to be followed in all games organized by the League. No applicable playing rule may be changed or disregarded by coaches, commissioners, or coordinators, by agreement or otherwise. Changes to the playing rules may only be made by the Board of Directors.

 

LAW I: The Field of Play

The soccer field is rectangular; its length must be between 100 and 130 yards and its width between 50 and 100 yards, but in all cases the length shall exceed the width. At each end, centered along the end line (call the goal line), is a goal (eight feet high and twenty-four feet wide); a goal area (extending six yards in front of and six yards on either side of the goal itself); a penalty area (extending eighteen yards out from the center of the goal). All of the aforementioned areas, as well as the goal lines and sideline (called touchlines), should be marked. The field is also marked with a center circle, ten yards in radius, centered at the center of the rectangular playing area; a midfield line which divides the longest dimension of the rectangular playing area into two equal halves; two penalty arcs, each ten yards in radius, and each centered on one of the two penalty spots (the arcs are only marked on that part of the arc which exists outside of the penalty area); and four corner arcs, one at each corner of the field, each arc being one yard in radius, centered at the corner of the field and marked only on that part of the arc which exists inside the playing field. A corner flag on a pole at least five feet high, having a non-pointed top, should be placed at each of the four corners of the rectangular playing area.

The size of the playing area may be varied to account for the physical ability of youth players.

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS:

1.      Field dimensions for the U8 and U10 groups may range from 50 to 75 yards in length and from 30 and 40 yards in width. The goal size for U8 should be no more than six feet in height and eighteen feet in width. The goal size for U10 may be reduced to seven feet in height and twenty-one feet in width.

2.      Fields for the U12 and U14 age groups should be at least 60 yards wide and 100 yards long.

3.      Dimensions of interior markings (goal areas, penalty areas, center circles, and penalty arcs) may be scaled down where required by the outside dimensions of the playing area, but they should not be scaled down more than the amount required to maintain proportionality to the reduced outside dimensions.

4.      Restraining lines are recommended for the side of the field normally occupied by teams. These lines should be marked to confine the coach or substitute players to an area at least one yard outside the touchline and between the midfield line and the outer boundary of the penalty area.

5.      Where space allows, players and coaches from both teams should occupy the area along one touchline, and spectators for both teams should occupy the area along the other touchline. (No spectators or participants are allowed along the goal lines.)

6.      In the case of a field which is playable, but on which the markings have become invisible, for whatever reason, the lines and markings shall be assumed to be present and decisions rendered accordingly by the referee.

LAW II: The Ball

The ball is made of leather or other approved material. Its circumference is between 27 and 28 inches, and its weight is between 14 and 16 ounces.

The ball cannot be changed during a game without the referee’s permission.

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS:

1.      Standard “Size 3” balls will be used for U8.

2.      Standard “Size 4” balls will be used for U10 and U12.

3.      Standard “Size 5” balls will be used for U14.

 

LAW II: Number of Players

A maximum of eleven players per team, one of whom is designated as the goalkeeper, may participate in the game at any time.

Any of the players may change places with the goalkeeper, provided the referee is notified of the change prior to its occurrence, and provided that the change takes place during a stoppage in play.

A game cannot be played if there are fewer than seven players on either of the teams. It is not required that both teams have the same number of players on the field.

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS:

1.      All members of the teams present for the game must play at least two quarters (or fifths in the case of U6) of each game.

2.      A player who does not arrive before the start of a game forfeits his or her right to play two quarters (or fifths in the case of U6) in that game. Such a player must, however, be allowed to play at least one, provided he or she arrived before the beginning of the second half of the game.

3.      In the U8 age classification, no player may play more than one quarter more, in any game, than the player on his or her team who plays the fewest number of quarters in that game. The intent of this rule is to equalize, to the maximum extent possible, the amount of playing time for all players in this age classification.

4.      Substitutions are permitted only between quarters, at halftime, for an injured player when approved by the referee, or for a player who has been cautioned by the referee (although such removal is not mandatory).

5.      In U8, U10, and U12 divisions, a player who plays at the goalkeeper position in any game must play at least one quarter as a field player in that same game.

6.      In the U8 division, the maximum players on the field for each team will be seven. For this age division only, games may be played with as few as five players per team on the field. In the U10 division, the maximum number of players on the field for each team shall be eight and games may be played with as few as six players per team on the field.

7.      Prior to each game, each team shall designate no more than two players as captains. The captain(s) shall represent the team at the coin toss and shall be the only players granted the privilege of addressing the referee concerning rule interpretations.

 

LAW IV: Player’s Equipment

A player may not wear anything that is dangerous to another player

The goalkeeper must wear colors that distinguish him or her from other players on both teams and from the referee.

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS:

1.      Players are not permitted to wear jewelry of any type.

2.      Players may wear gym shoes, tennis shoes, or soccer shoes with molded rubber or plastic cleats only. Shoes with screw-in studs made of any material are not permitted.

3.      Shin guards are mandatory for all players during games. Shin guards with exposed hard or sharp surfaces shall not be permitted.

4.      Players are not permitted to wear casts or braces of any type on any extremity of their body during games, even if covered by padding.For purposed of this rule, elastic bandages, elastic wraps, and adhesive tape are not considered braces, unless they are used to cover surfaces or materials that would otherwise be prohibited by this rule.

5.      Face, nose, or eyeglass protections is not allowed. Helmets or hats of any type are not allowed, except that goalkeepers are permitted the use of a soft-billed cap when, in the judgement of the referee, such a cap is needed and will not endanger other players. Baseball caps are considered to have a firm bill and are not allowed.

6.      The provisions in the preceding rule notwithstanding, in the event of inclement weather players may wear a soft hat (of the variety known as “stocking hats”), provided that said hats are close-fitting and are not allowed to swing free in a manner which could distract or entangle other players.

7.      All players except the goalkeeper must wear the approved team uniform provided by the League for all games. In the event of inclement weather, additional clothing may be work beneath the regular team uniform.

8.      The judgement of the referee as to the potential hazard posed by any article of equipment or apparel shall be final, except that the referee may not allow any equipment or apparel which is specifically prohibited by these rules.

 

LAW V: Referee

The referee is in complete charge of the game. He or she is also the timekeeper.

The referee’s authority begins when he or she enters the playing field area.

The referee is empowered to stop play for injury or other reasons, and to restart play when he or she is ready. The referee may also end the game prematurely due to adverse conditions such as inclement weather or spectator interference.

The referee administers penalties, and cautions or expels players for misconduct.

The referee shall allow no person other that players to enter the playing field without his or her permission.

The referee shall allow no person other than players to enter the playing field without his or her permission.

The referee’s decisions, on all matters under his or her jurisdiction, are final and cannot be protested.

The referee shall refrain from penalizing in cases where, in his or her judgement, by doing so he or she would be giving an advantage to the team which would have incurred the penalty. When the referee applies this “advantage rule”, he or she should indicate that the foul has been seen.

If a referee allows the play to continue under the “advantage rule” he or she retains the right to deal with an offending player at the first opportunity.

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS:

1.      In the Evansville Youth Soccer League, coaches are subject to cautions and ejection by the referee for misconduct.

2.      In the even that no referee is present within ten minutes after the scheduled time for the beginning of a game. The game may be played with a volunteer referee, provided that both coaches agree in advance to the use of said volunteer. If no volunteer referee agreeable to both coaches can be located, the game will be played as schedule with refereeing provided by the coaches of the teams involved.

3.      The referee’s authority continues throughout the game, including periods during which the ball is dead (such as halftime), until the players and coaches have left the vicinity of the playing field.

4.      In the U6 division, one adult per team may be on the field during the game to assist the players in properly positioning themselves, provided that said adults in no way interfere with the actual playing of the game. Adults on the field should exercise particular care in staying away from the area immediately in front of the goal.

5.      The League does not furnish referees for game in the U6 division.

 

LAW VI: Linesmen

The function of the linesmen is to assist the referee in carrying out his or her responsibility for officiating the game.

The linesmen carry out their responsibilities by furnishing signals to the referee and by consultation when requested by the referee. Signals indicated by the linesmen do not constitute judgements affecting the play of the game until they have been affirmed by the referee.

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS:

1.      Linesmen are general not provided by the League for Evansville Youth Soccer League games.

2.      Club (volunteer) linesmen may be used, at the discretion of the referee, but the duties of these linesmen are limited to indicating when the ball has passed out of play. When a club linesmen is used, it is the referee’s responsibility to assure that the club linesmen are properly instructed as to their duties and the knowledge needed to fulfill them.

 

LAW VII: Duration of the Game

A game consist of two forty-five minute periods. Time is extended at the end of a period, if necessary, to allow the taking of a penalty kick.

Basically, the clock runs continuously throughout each period of a soccer match. However, time may be added, at the discretion of the referee, to any period unduly disrupted by accident, injury, “time wasting”, or other cause.

The interval of time between the first and second halves of the game (halftime) shall not exceed five minutes.

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS:

1.      Games for the U6 division shall consist of either four ten minute quarters or five eight minute fifths.

2.      Games for the U8 and U10 division shall consist of four ten minute quarters.

3.      Games for the U12 division shall consist of four twelve minute quarters.

4.      Games for the U14 division shall consist of four fifteen minute quarters.

5.      The interval of time between the first and second quarters and between the third and fourth quarters shall not exceed two minutes.

 

LAW VIII: The Start of Play

A kickoff is used to start play at the beginning of each period and after a goal has been scored. The ball is placed on the midfield line at the center of the field and a player from the kicking team kicks it into the opponent’s end of the field. Until the ball is first played by the player from the kicking team, all players must be on their team’s side of the midfield line, and no player on the opposing team may be within ten yards of the ball (i.e., within the center circle).

The ball is not considered to be in play until it is kicked and moves forward. The player who first kicks the ball on a kickoff may not touch it again until it has been touched by another player. A goal may be scored directly from the kick off.

The toss of a coin before the game is used to determine which team will have its choice of which end of the field to attack initially. The team which wins the toss decides which goal it will attack in the first half. The other team performs the kick off.

After a team scores a goal, the game is restarted with a kickoff by the opposing team.

When restarting play after stoppages other than the scoring of a goal or those resulting from the ball passing over the goal line or a sideline, the referee drops the ball at the point where it was when it was last in play. However, when the point where the ball was last in play is within the goal are of either team, the referee shall drop the ball at the nearest point outside the goal area. When the ball is dropped to restart play, it may not be played by a player from either team until it has touched the ground.

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS:

1.      Teams will change ends of the field at the beginning of each half.

2.      The kickoff to begin the second half (third quarter) of the game will be taken by a player from the same team which kicked off to start the game.

3.      Kickoffs to begin the second and fourth quarters will be taken by a player from the opposite team to that of the player who kicked off to the start the previous quarter.

 

LAW IX: Ball In and Out of Play

The ball is out of play when it has wholly crossed the end line or sideline, whether on the ground or in the air, and when the game has been stopped by the referee. The ball is in play at all other times it is wholly or partially within the field of play, including when it rebounds off a player, referee, corner flag, goalpost, or crossbar.

In the event of an apparent infraction, the ball remains in play until the referee indicates the infractions.

 

LAW X: Method of Scoring

A goal is scored when the whole of the ball has passed over the goal line, between the goalposts and under the crossbar, provided that no foul has caused the play to be stopped before that event.

The team scoring the largest number of goals wins the game. If the two teams score the same number of goals, the game is declared a tie.

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS:

1.      In the U6 division, no scores shall be kept and no wins, ties, or losses shall be declared for any team in any game.

 

LAW XI: Offside

A player is in an offside position if he or she is nearer the opponent’s goal line than the ball, at the moment the ball is played, unless: (1) he or she is in his or her own end of the field (i.e., on the end of the field being defended by his or her team); or (2) two opponents are nearer or equidistant to the their own goal line than he or she is; or (3) the ball was last played by an opponent; or (4) he or she received the ball directly from a goal kick, corner kick, throw in, or drop ball.

The referee shall only call the offside foul when a player is in the offside position and, in the opinion of the referee, participating in the play in such a way as to have gained an advantage or be seeking to gain an advantage from being in the offside position.

Seeking to gain an advantage includes not only an advantage from himself or herself, but also interfering with or distracting an opponent. This includes obstructing the view of the opposing goalkeeper.

The penalty for the offside foul is an indirect free kick awarded to the opposing team to be taken from the point where the foul occurred. The point of the foul is the location of the player who was in the offside position.

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS:

1.      Offside fouls shall not be called in the U6 division.

 

LAW XII: Fouls and Misconduct

A player who intentionally commits any of the following nine offenses shall have his or her team penalized by the awarding of a direct free kick to the opposing team at the point where the offense occurred:

1.      Kicking or attempting to kick an opponent;

2.      Tripping an opponent;

3.      Jumping at an opponent;

4.      Charging an opponent in a violent or dangerous manner;

5.      Charging an opponent from behind;

6.      Striking or attempting to strike an opponent or spitting at an opponent;

7.      Hold an opponent;

8.      Pushing an opponent;

9.      Carrying, striking, or propelling the ball with the hand or arm (except the goalkeeper when within his or her own penalty area).

If a player from the defending team intentionally commits one of the nine offenses listed above in his or her team’s penalty area (regardless of the location of the ball at the time the offense occurs, provided that the ball is in play), the opposing team is awarded a penalty kick.

A player who commits any of the six following offenses shall have his or her team penalized by the awarding of an indirect free kick to the opposing team at the point where the offense occurred:

1.      Playing in a manner considered by the referee to be dangerous;

2.      Charging an opponent fairly (i.e., with the shoulder), but when the ball is not within playing distance and no attempt is being made to play it;

3.      Intentionally obstructing an opponent (i.e., running between an opponent and the ball or placing the body so as to form an obstacle to an opponent) when not within playing distance of the ball;

4.      Charging the goalkeeper when he or she is inside his or her penalty area;

5.      When playing as a goalkeeper; indulging in tactics which, in the opinion of the referee, are designed to delay the game to the advantage of his or her team;

6.      When playing as goalkeeper (U12-U14), the goalkeeper picks up a ball that was intentionally kicked to the goalkeeper by a member of his or her own team or handles a ball that was received from a throw in by a member of his own team (Indirect free kick from point where goal keeper picks up ball.)

A player shall be cautioned (shown a yellow card) and the opposing team awarded an indirect free kick, if he or she:

1.      Enters or leaves the field of play without the referee’s permission (except in normal course of play); or

2.      Persistently infringes the rules of the game; or

3.      Shows, by word or action, dissent from any decision of the referee; or

4.      Is guilty of ungentlemanly conduct.

In the case of the first offense listed above, the indirect free kick is taken from the point at which the ball was located at the time the referee stopped the game to administer the caution; in the other three cases the indirect free kick is taken from the point where the offense occurred.

A player shall be sent off (shown a red card) and the opposing team awarded an indirect free kick (unless the offense committed is one of the nine offenses listed above, in which case a direct free kick shall be awarded) at the point where the offense occurs, if he or she:

1.      Is guilty of violent conduct (Note: the act of spitting at officials or other players is considered violent conduct) or serious foul play; or

2.      Uses foul or abusive language; or

3.      Persists in misconduct after having received a caution.

A player who has been sent off may not return to the game and may not be replaced, except that in the vent that the goalkeeper is sent off one of the remaining players must be designated to play as goalkeeper.

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS:

1.      A player who intentionally charges the goalkeeper when the goalkeeper is in possession of the ball and inside his or her penalty area shall be sent off without warning (i.e., automatic ejection). Possession is defined as control of the ball, even though only with one hand if the ball is stationary on the ground. The opposing team is awarded a direct free kick at the point of the offense.

2.      A player intentionally kicks or attempts to kick the ball when it is in the possession of the goalkeeper (same definition of possession as above), shall be cautioned (shown a yellow card) and the opposing team shall be awarded an indirect free kick from the point where the offense occurred.

3.      If a goalkeeper strikes or attempts to strike an opposing player by throwing the ball at him or her or by pushing him or her with the ball while holding it, the referee shall award the opposing team a penalty kick, if the offense occurs in the penalty area, or a direct free kick at the point where the offense occurs if the offense occurs outside the penalty area.

4.      The goal keeper in the U12 and U14 divisions, after controlling the ball with his or her hands, shall put the ball in play within six (6) steps. The goalkeeper may not then regain control of the ball with his or her hands until either (a) another player from his or her team plays the ball outside the penalty area; or (b) a member of the opposing team plays the ball. Violation of this rule shall result in the referee awarding the opposing team an indirect free kick from the point where the goalkeeper committed the offense (the point of the fifth step, in that case, or the point where he or she retains control, in the latter case).

5.      The goalkeeper in the U8 and U10 divisions, after gaining control of the ball with his or her hands, may take an unlimited number of steps before releasing the ball into play, provided he or she does not leave the penalty area and provided that he or she does not intentionally delay the game. If the goalkeeper leaves the penalty area before releasing the ball, the opposing team shall be awarded a direct free kick from the point where the offense occurs.

6.      If a player intentionally obstructs the goalkeeper in an attempt to interfere with the goalkeeper putting the ball into play, the referee shall award the opposing team an indirect free kick from the point where the offense occurs.

7.      A coach, adult volunteer, or nonparticipating player (a player not currently in the game) who enters the field of play without the permission of the referee shall be cautioned (shown a yellow card) and the opposing team shall be awarded an indirect free kick from the point at which the ball was located at the time of the offense.

8.      Any coach or adult volunteer who attempts to communicate with players on the field through the use of mechanical or electronic aids or who coaches from the sideline in a manner which, in the judgement of the referee, is disruptive to the game shall be cautioned (shown a yellow card) and the opposing team shall be awarded an indirect free kick from the point at which the ball was located at the time of the offense.

9.      Coaches and other adult volunteers may be cautioned and sent off by the referee for offenses, in each case, comparable to the offenses which would result in a player being cautioned or sent off.

10.  A coach or other adult volunteer who has been sent off by the referee must leave the vicinity of the playing area and may not participate in any way with the coaching or management of his or her team for the balance of the game. The individual who has been sent off may not return to the vicinity of the playing field until the game has been completed and the players and referee have left the field.

11.  If a coach is sent off and no other adult volunteer is present to coach the team, and no volunteer can be secured from the adults present, the referee shall declare the game abandoned.

12.  All instances in which the coach or adult volunteer is sent off by a referee must be reported, by the coach of the team involved, to the League Director within twenty-four hours. The League Director will investigate the event -- securing information from the referee, the individuals involved, and other individuals present as he or she sees fit – and will determine whether further penalties will be imposed on the individual(s) involved and the nature of said penalties. The League Director’s decision is not appealable.

13.  A player who has been sent off by the referee is not required to leave the vicinity of the playing field, provided that he or she conducts himself or herself in a sportsmanlike fashion after being sent off. The referee shall have the authority to require a player who has been sent off to leave the vicinity of the playing field if the player persists in disruptive, unsportsmanlike conduct after being sent off.

14.  There shall be no cautions or ejections of players in the U6 age classification.

15.  In the U6 division, the person(s) acting as referees should briefly (and kindly) explain to the offending player any foul called. For this division, fouls should only be called when necessary: (a) to maintain control of the game (i.e., insure the safety of the players); (b) to avoid gross inequities resulting from the obvious fouls; or (c) to promote an understanding of the rules of the game (as appropriate for players of this age).

16.  The League administrators have instructed officials to strictly enforce the use of foul and abusive language. However, referees shall be instructed that the first such offense by any player, coach, or adult volunteer, unless directed specifically at an individual (player or referee), shall result in the offender receiving a caution (shown a yellow card) rather than being sent off.

 

LAW XII: Free Kick

There are two types of free kicks: direct free kicks, from which a goal can be scored directly; and indirect free kicks, from which a goal cannot be scored until the ball has been touched by a player other than the player who initially takes the kick. A goal can be scored from an indirect free kick regardless of whether the second player touching the ball is a member of the same team as the kick or of the opposing team.

When a free kick is taken from a team’s own penalty area, all players from the opposing team must be outside the penalty area and at least ten yards from the ball, and they must remain outside the penalty area until the ball is in play. The ball is not in play until it is kicked and moves and is wholly outside the penalty area.

When a free kick is taken, all players from the opposing team must be at least ten (10) yards from the ball until it is in play, unless they are standing on their own goal line and between the goalposts. The ball is not in play until it has travelled at least the distance of its own circumference.

If a player of the opposing team encroaches into the penalty area, or within ten (10) yards of the ball, before the ball is put into play the referee shall delay the kick until the offending player complies with the rule. Players who do not retire to the proper distance when a free kick is taken must be cautioned.

The ball must be stationary when the free kick is taken, and the kicker may not play the ball a second time until it has been touched by another player.

A free kick awarded to a defending team in its goal area may be taken from any spot within that half of the goal area in which the kick is awarded.

An indirect free kick awarded to the attacking team in its opponent’s goal area shall be taken from the part of the goal area line parallel to the goal line at the point nearest where the offense was committed.

If, when a free kick is being taken, players from the opposing team move about or gesture in a way determined to distract their opponents, they shall be judged guilty of unsportsmanlike conduct and cautioned (shown a yellow card).

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS:

1.      A player from the opposing team who deliberately obstructs or interferes with the taking of a free kick is guilty of unsportsmanlike conduct and shall be cautioned (shown a yellow card).

2.      If the team taking a free kick requests that the referee enforce the “ten-yard” rule, and the referee stops the game to do so, the free kick cannot be taken until the referee signals that play is to resume.

 

LAW XIV: Penalty Kick

The penalty kick must be taken from the penalty spot, twelve yards in front of the goal. All players other than the player who has been clearly designated to take the penalty kick and the opposing goalkeeper must be on the playing field but outside the penalty area and at least ten yards from the ball. The penalty kick must be kicked forward, and the kick shall not play the ball a second time until it is touched by another player. The ball shall be deemed in play when it has been kicked and moves forward.

A goal may be scored directly from a penalty kick.

The defending goalkeeper shall remain on his or her own goal line between the goal posts, facing the kick, until the ball has been kicked.

If the time in a period is extended to permit the taking of a penalty kick, the period ends when a goal is scored or immediately if the goalkeeper stops the ball or deflects it outward. However, if the goalkeeper partially deflects the ball, or it is strikes on or both of the goal posts or the crossbar, or any combination of these, and it eventually wholly crosses the goal line as a result of its own momentum, the goal shall be allowed.

The penalty kick shall not be taken until a signal is given by the referee indicating that players have taken up positions in accordance with the rules.

If a member of the defending team commits infringement (encroachment within ten (10) yards of the ball or within the penalty area) during the taking of a penalty kick, the player may be cautioned (shown a yellow card) and the kick shall be retaken, if a goal was not scored.

If a member of the kicking team commits infringement during the taking of a penalty kick, the player may be cautioned (shown a yellow card) and, if a goal is scored, the goal shall be disallowed and the penalty kick retaken. If a goal is not scored, the referee may stop the game, administer the caution, and award the opposing team an indirect free kick at the point of the offense.

If members of both teams commit infringements during the taking of a penalty kick, the players may be cautioned (shown a yellow card) and the kick shall be retaken whether a goal was scored or not, and if a goal was scored, it shall be disallowed.

If, after the referee signals for the penalty kick to be taken, the goalkeeper moves from off the goal line, the referee shall allow the kick to be taken. If a goal is not scored, the penalty kick shall be retaken.

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS:

1.      If, in the judgement of the referee, a goalkeeper, or any other player, delays unduly in assuming the prescribed position for a penalty kick, that player shall be guilty of ungentlemanly conduct and cautioned (shown a yellow card).

2.      Penalty kicks shall not be taken in the U6 division.

 

LAW XV: Throw In

To restart play after the whole of the ball has passed over the touchline, on the ground or in the air, the ball is thrown in from the point where it crossed the touchline by a player from the team opposite to that of the player who last touched the ball before it crossed the touchline. The thrower must use both hand and shall deliver the ball from behind and over his or her head. The thrower must be facing the field of play at the moment of delivering the ball, and part of each foot must be on the ground on the touchline or outside the field of play. The ball is in play as soon as it enters the field of play, but the thrower cannot play it again until it has been touched by another player.

A goal cannot be scored directly from a throw in.

A player cannot be guilty of an offside foul when receiving the ball directly from a throw in.

Opposing players who move about or gesture in a way determined to distract or impede the thrower shall be guilty of ungentlemanly conduct and shall be cautioned.

If a ball is improperly thrown in, the throw in shall be awarded to the opposing team and taken from the same spot. Throwing the ball in from a point other than the point where the ball left the field of play constitutes an improper throw in.

INTERPRETATIONS AND LOCAL MODIFICATIONS.

1.      In the U6 division, a player who improperly throws the ball in shall have the correct method explained to him or her and shall be given a second opportunity to throw the ball in properly. The ball shall not change possession on the basis of an improper throw in for the U6 division.

 

LAW XVI: Goal Kick

When the whole of the ball passes over the goal line, excluding that part between the goal posts and under the crossbar, whether on the ground or in the air, having last been played by a member of the attacking team, it shall be kicked directly into play by a player of the defending team. The goal kick must be taken from within the goal area. The ball must be kicked beyond the penalty area before it is in play, and members of the opposing team must remain outside the penalty area until the ball is in play. The kicker cannot play the ball a second time until it has been touched by another player.

A goal may be scored directly from a goal kick, but only against the opposing team.

A goal kick taken improperly (kicked twice consecutively by the same player within the penalty area; not kicked beyond the penalty area; or kicked with an opponent in the penalty area) must be retaken.

If the player taking the goal kick plays the ball a second time outside the penalty area before the ball has been touched by another player, the opposing team is award an indirect free kick from the spot of the infraction.

LAW XVII: Corner Kick

When the whole of the ball passes over the goal line, excluding that portion between the goal posts and under the crossbar, either in the air or on the ground, after having been last touched by a member of the defending team, a member of the attacking team shall take a corner kick. The player taking the corner kick shall place the whole of the ball within the field of play and within the corner arc at the corner of the field closest to the point where the ball crossed the goal line, and the corner kick shall be taken from there without the corner flag being moved.

A goal may be scored directly from a corner kick.

Players from the team opposing the player taking the corner kick may not approach within ten yards of the ball until it is in play. The ball is in play when it is kicked and moves. If a player of the defending team is guilty of infringement on a corner kick, the kick shall be retaken.

The player taking the corner kick may not play the ball a second time until it has been touched by another player. If the player who took the corner kick touches the ball a second time before it is touched by another player, an indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team from the point of the infraction.

No member of the attacking team can be guilty of an offside foul when receiving the ball directly from a corner kick.

Evansville Youth Soccer League

EVANSVILLE YOUTH SOCCER, P.O. Box 2804
Evansville, Indiana 47728
Email : [email protected]
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